Child Trafficking

Principles for the safe accommodation of child victims of trafficking

ECPAT UK has launched its On the Safe Side report, which details 10 principles for the safe accommodation of child victims of trafficking. The report was written following structured face-to-face interviews and a roundtable discantus with a range of relevant professionals, including local authority children’s services, the police, NGOs, and organizations accommodating child victims of trafficking. Through this research, ECPAT UK identified that there are no commonly agreed safety and protection standards across the UK for the placement of children who are suspected or known to be trafficked.

The OPSC report on sexual exploitation and child-friendly justice in Poland

The country report reviews the national laws, policies and programs that have been designed to implement the rights contained in the OPSC. The report aim to uncover legal reforms undertaken by national governments following their ratification of the OPSC and to assess how and whether these laws have brought that country into compliance with the international obligations under the Protocol.

A handbook on methods to protect children on the move

This handbook is designed to help organisations which already have experience of trying to protect children from exploitation or other forms of abuse to assess whether they are using the most appropriate methods. This means, reviewing the methods you use to prevent children being exploited or abused; and finding out whether a more detailed understanding of the experience of a particular category of children - children on the move - helps you identify alternative or additional ways to protect such children and to enable them to turn their hopes and ambitions into reality.

Report on Tackling the Demand that forces Human Trafficking

Despite the importance of reducing demand to combat trafficking in persons, there is a dearth of information about good practices in demand reduction, and few such programs have been evaluated. The Europe and Eurasia region has recorded an increase in incidences of trafficking into and within the region, demonstrating a demand for trafficked labour and services from both beyond and within the region. In spite of this, demand reduction efforts have been few and far between.