Child and Internet

Dont lose! Campaign against commercial sexual exploitation in Poland and Ukraine

Commercial sexual exploitation of children means not only forced prostitution, but also undertaking sexual contacts with minors in exchange for money or gifts. It is a form of child abuse and a crime punished with imprisonment. Although teenagers offering or consenting to sex in exchange for gifts or money can look older than they are in reality, the adults are those responsible for abusing a child.

During big sport events children are more at risk of commercial sexual exploitation due to increased inflow of tourists, feeling of anonymity of offenders in a foreign country and organised crime activity.

Nobody's Children Foundation in Poland and Child Well- being Fund in Ukraine are running educational campaign on the issue of threats associated with commercial sexual exploitation faced by children and youth.


Internet platform for young children in Poland

Nobody's Children Foundation in cooperation with the Orange Foundation has developed an educational project for children aged 4-5 years. The aim of the internet platform www.necio.pl is to teach young children about the safety on the Internet. The hero of the children to "fun on the Internet". The project is cofinanced from the European Commission's "Safer Internet".

Publication on child abuse and neglect in Poland

The NCF quarterly no. 36 "Abused Child. Theory, Research and Practice" consists of statistics concerning child abuse and neglect in Poland eg. experiences of physical and emotional violence, child abandonment, sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children,  mortality of children and youth, child poverty. The purpose of it was to present the scale and nature of these threats on the basis of what is recorded or investigated, but also identify issues about which very little is known.


The Protection of Children Online: Risks Faced by Children Online and Policies to Protect Them

The report focuses on online risks for children and policies to protect them as Internet users. It examines direct and indirect policy measures available to OECD member and non-member countries to help mitigate risks for children online.